Archive for September, 2009

Samsung AMOLED 12M (SCH-W880) announced in Korea [Updated w/ specs] | Samsung Hub

Posted in Uncategorized on September 29, 2009 by nuKnuK

UPDATE: Specs added below and sadly, there’s no word on Wi-Fi or GPS.

UPDATE 2: GSMArena has got some live pictures of the phone and reckons Samsung will swap T-DMB with Wi-Fi and GPS in M8920 (international version).

After being revealed couple of times in the past few days, Samsung has rightly made the world’s first phone with 12MP camera and optical zoom official. AMOLED 12M or SCH-W880 can take pictures at 12 megapixel resolution and offers 3x optical zoom, 2x digital zoom, 720p video recording (1280×720) at 30fps and Xenon flash. It also supports touch auto focus, image stabilization, Smart Auto (that automatically selects the scene according to environment) and face detection.

Rest of the feature set is yet to be confirmed but the phone has a 3.3-inch AMOLED WVGA (800×480) touchscreen display, TouchWiz UI and 4GB internal memory.

It will hit the Korean retail shelves early next month.

via Samsung AMOLED 12M (SCH-W880) announced in Korea [Updated w/ specs] | Samsung Hub.

Microchip in the Eye Seeks to Restore Vision | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Posted in Uncategorized on September 24, 2009 by nuKnuK

A chip inside the eye that can help blind people see again is moving closer to reality as researchers at MIT work on a retinal implant that can bypass damaged cells and directly offer visual input to the brain.

Patients who receive the implant will wear a pair of glasses that has a tiny camera attached to it. The camera will send images to a microchip implanted in the eyeball that channels the input to the brain.

It won’t entirely restore normal vision, say the researchers, but it will offer just enough sight to help a blind person navigate a room.

“If they can recognize faces of people in a room, that brings them into the social environment as opposed to sitting there waiting for someone to talk to them,” says Shawn Kelly, a a researcher in MIT’s Research Laboratory for Electronics and a member of the project.

MIT’s latest quest should be of interest to people like Rob Spence, a Canadian film maker who is on a quest to put a tiny wireless video camera into his empty right eye socket. Spence is looking to capture the world around him and a retinal implant like that from MIT could actually help bring him closer to his quest.

Here’s how the implant works. The glasses that patients wear contains a coil that can wirelessly transmit power to receiving coils surrounding the eyeball. The eyeball holds a microchip  encased in a sealed titanium case to avoid damage from water seepage. The chip receives visual information and activates electrodes that in turn fire the nerve cells that carry visual input to the brain.

A research team, led by MIT professor of electrical engineering John Wyatt, plans to start testing the prototype in blind patients within the next three years.

With feedback, researchers can configure the algorithm implemented by the chip to produce useful vision. Ultimately, the goal is to produce a chip that can be implanted for at least 10 years.

It’s a risky and challenging procedure as researchers have to design an implant that won’t damage the eye. In the October issue of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering journal, researchers have said they hope to attach the implant to the outside of the eye, and put the electrodes behind the retina.

via Microchip in the Eye Seeks to Restore Vision | Gadget Lab | Wired.com.

Redesigned Coke Can Won’t Roll Off the Table – coke can – Gizmodo

Posted in Uncategorized on September 23, 2009 by nuKnuK

This concept Coke can design uses a manufacturing process called impact extrusion to form geometric shapes into the can rather than making it round. I’m not sure how practical it is, but I like it.

via Redesigned Coke Can Won’t Roll Off the Table – coke can – Gizmodo.

Plastic Concrete: Hippie’s Wet Dream, Hit Man’s Worst Nightmare – Plastic Concrete – Gizmodo

Posted in Uncategorized on September 22, 2009 by nuKnuK

Imagine concrete that’s two-thirds granulated plastic, but is as strong as the stuff currently in use. Architect/engineer Henry Miller figured out how to make it, not just on paper, but in a couple of real-life structures.

Concrete is usually 60% to 75% “aggregate,” sand, gravel or crushed stone, according to people who should know. What this engineer did was grind up the “landfill-bound” plastic materials, and then mix them with pure concrete. Not only did he save the plastic from environmentally unfriendly alternatives (landfill or heat-related processing), he also avoided the use of mined gravel or sand. Once the bricks were made—allegedly to withstand 3000 to 5000 psi—he built the structures above.

I don’t know what the Portland Cement Association will make of it, but if there’s any chance these bricks float, I think members of the Concrete Boot Association, aka Cosa Nostra, could be mightily displeased.

via Plastic Concrete: Hippie’s Wet Dream, Hit Man’s Worst Nightmare – Plastic Concrete – Gizmodo.

Courier: First Details of Microsoft’s Secret Tablet – Microsoft courier tablet – Gizmodo

Posted in Uncategorized on September 22, 2009 by nuKnuK

Courier is a real device, and we’ve heard that it’s in the “late prototype” stage of development. It’s not a tablet, it’s a booklet. The dual 7-inch (or so) screens are multitouch, and designed for writing, flicking and drawing with a stylus, in addition to fingers. They’re connected by a hinge that holds a single iPhone-esque home button. Statuses, like wireless signal and battery life, are displayed along the rim of one of the screens. On the back cover is a camera, and it might charge through an inductive pad, like the Palm Touchstone charging dock for Pre.

Until recently, it was a skunkworks project deep inside Microsoft, only known to the few engineers and executives working on it—Microsoft’s brightest, like Entertainment & Devices tech chief and user-experience wizard J. Allard, who’s spearheading the project. Currently, Courier appears to be at a stage where Microsoft is developing the user experience and showing design concepts to outside agencies.

via Courier: First Details of Microsoft’s Secret Tablet – Microsoft courier tablet – Gizmodo.

Screw a House, I’m Buying a Camper Bike – Camper Kart – Gizmodo

Posted in Uncategorized on September 16, 2009 by nuKnuK

Houses are passe and RVs are overrated. The Camper Bike is where it’s at. I don’t care if sleeping—let alone functioning—in the thing is a physical impossibility. I WANT ONE.

Artist Kevin Cyr worked on the Camper Bike in 2008, though little is revealed about the technical specs, it looks like an overgrown tricycle with a camper shell that’s been sawed in half (maybe even thirds). A concept sketch also shows room for a couch, a bed, and a desk/table with a TV. I like it already.

via Screw a House, I’m Buying a Camper Bike – Camper Kart – Gizmodo.

Volcano-Shaped Italian Mall Gives Malls a Good Name – volcano buono – Gizmodo

Posted in Uncategorized on September 14, 2009 by nuKnuK

Malls are never really all that interesting, architecturally speaking, here in America. But apparently that’s not the case in Italy, because this amazing Volcano-inspires structure makes me want to hang out at the mall all day long.

Volcano Buono is a commercial center right near Mt. Vesuvius, the only volcano on mainland Europe to have erupted in the last century.

The roof of most of the structure is what looks like a grassy knoll, a surface that holds over 25,000 plants and helps naturally insulate the interior spaces. The crater holds an outdoor theater, a market and a “sloping pine forest.” In addition to the normal mall shops inside, there’s also a 2,000 seat cinema, a supermarket, a hotel and a bunch of restaurants. Seriously, how cool is this thing?

via Volcano-Shaped Italian Mall Gives Malls a Good Name – volcano buono – Gizmodo.